Polymer Clay Fantasy Figurines

Sword and sorcery fantasy has captivated me since I was a child. It’s no wonder I choose to create my own mythological beings. These are the characters I created which I eventually began to write a story for. Here you’ll learn how I created them and I’ll also include their origin blurb.

Name of figure: Gulik Horridus of the Troglodytarum

Inspiration: Goblins, hobgoblin, and orcs

Materials used: Polymer clay, tinfoil, glaze, craft wire

Length of time to complete: Over a week

Problems along the way: Arms weren’t long enough. Rookie error.

Mistakes: Forgot to add eyelids.

What I would change if I recreated this figure: Adding eyelids will improve the face.

What I like about this figure: I’m extremely satisfied for a first go at it.

Notes: Gulik was my very first attempt at polymer clay sculpture. Because of this, I have a special attachment to him. Looking at him now, four years later, I’m able to judge him more critically. As a sculptor, you may find yourself emotionally attached to your work, especially when it’s new. I now look at my work and easily see shortcomings I didn’t at the time of his creation. This goes for all my sculptures (and even my blogging). Still, I’m quite proud of the result.

I started out with some craft wire and primarily built his stance while Jason and the Argonauts played in the background. Due to my lack of experience at the time, I didn’t include his hands. This was a mistake I only made once. Skipping ahead, after much of the clay was already in place, I realized I needed to pull his clay hands off and add wire to the stubs of his forearms. This set me back several days. That was a bummer.

The wire acts as a skeleton. Extremities such as hands and limbs need wire. The clay won’t hold without a skeleton. I went rather light wrapping the tinfoil over the skeleton and it took me an entire night to do. It took over a week to complete this one figure. At my current experience level, it would only take a day or two at the most. Gulik was ultimately a trial and error experiment.

The tusks were also a challenge for the first time. Each wired tusk is not connected to the main skeleton. This came out surprisingly well, and the final glaze helped strengthen any weak points. He’s a very durable figurine today and if he’s taken care of, he’ll still be around after I’m gone.

You may notice around Gulik’s vest area, that the clay smeared a bit. This is because of the long duration of his creation. Going back over it several times to get it right, the clay became too warm from the heat of my hands. Avoid this by simply spending less time sculpting an area. You definitely want the clay cool and on the harder side. Once things start getting blended together it becomes more difficult to correct.

The name

Coming up with the name Gulik Horridus wasn’t easy. Try to do something original and make it your own after the accomplishments of Tolkien, Lewis, Gygax, and others isn’t easy. “Horridus” is part of the scientific name of the timber rattlesnake. I’m an avid snake enthusiast. Troglodytarum has obvious similarities to troglodytes but the idea came from a cult horror film from the early 1980s called The Pit.

As I began building this figure, I obviously had orcs and goblins in mind. I also wanted to include a “fairy tale” kind of look/feel. While his arms and fists are large and bulky, I purposely made his legs shorter and placed points on the tips of his boots.

A revised version of Gulik Horridus is on the horizon. This will happen before Christmas 2018. I’ll film the entire process as my video first tutorial.

Name of figure: Bone Stealer the Buzzardwere

Inspiration: A turkey vulture.

Materials used: Polymer clay, tinfoil, craft wire

Length of time to complete: 2 days

Problems along the way: None

Mistakes: The arrow is too thick.

What I would change if I recreated this figure: Thin the arrow a bit. Perhaps use a wire.

What I like about this figure: The detail, especially in the face.

Notes: By the time Bone Stealer, the Buzzardwere came about, I had quite a few figurines under my belt. I would go on these creative binges. Sometimes I’d make figures that had potential while others were lacking. I think this particular figure shows the stronger side of my vision. The detail in the face is what I appreciate the most. I feel I’m stronger where my true inspiration lies. In other words, I enjoy creating “bad guys” more than “good guys”. I like creating creatures and monsters when there are no limitations.

I came up with a particular poem to go along with the story of these figures. The inspiration for Bone Stealer developed from a character I had already created called the winter ghoul. I had to come up with two other characters that are mentioned in the poem. This is also how the weregoats came about. I mention this because it’s interesting to build a story first, before creating the figure. Up until that point, it was always the other way around where I created the story around the figure. With Bone Stealer, everything came together on its own in a flowing motion. It’s great when it goes that way. I wish all of them came about as easily. Ironically, it was the original winter ghoul that had me stumped, but more on that story later.

If you notice, Bone Stealer has a feathered tail that reaches the floor. In building polymer clay figurines, proper leverage is needed for the figure to stand on its own. This usually doesn’t present a problem with two-footed figures most of the time but occasionally it does. In a case such as Bone Stealer, I used the tail for extra leverage. I don’t consider this cheating because it works for the character and others that have tails, walking sticks, or long robes. Sometimes you can use such objects to your advantage if they work and don’t seem out-of-place. There are other such tweaks and hacks covered in this site.

 

The Crowns of Ice Under Sorghel

To the frozen land
Just north of Maggita
Hidden deep beneath eternal winter snow
Lies two crowns of two kingdoms laid low
Weregoats, Buzzardweres and the
Winterghouls would attack any fools
That dare pass through their realm
For they know if any would try to claim the crowns
The land of icy Sorghel would be no more…

Name of figure: Lupus Warwulf of the Wilkolach

Inspiration: Centaurs, wolves, Greek mythology, and werewolves.

Materials used: Polymer clay, tinfoil, glaze, craft wire, paint.

Length of time to complete: 5 days.

Problems along the way: Had to completely redo the body upon the first attempt.

Mistakes: None.

What I would change if I recreated this figure: Not very much besides adding more detail to the face. Perhaps make it smaller in size.

What I like about this figure: Overall detail.

Notes: Lupus Warwulf was the second polymer clay figure I completed. This one was epic. I have always been interested in Greek mythology and creatures like centaurs, fauns, the Cyclops, and the Minotaur. Greek mythology produced the greatest monsters, without question. I wanted to create something obviously based off a centaur but wanted to give it my twist. After some research online, I noticed that several centaur spinoffs were out there already. I remember finding a lion centaur which admittedly crossed my mind when I first came up with the idea. It seemed crossing a wolf with the original myth hadn’t been done yet so I went with it.

I created Lupus in two separate parts before connecting them together. The first part was simply the head down to the front feet like I would create any figure. After that, I created the body separately and prayed I’d be able to mesh the two together. I went in blind on this, no tutorial covered what I was doing.

Problems arose with the original body, referring to the long part with the tail. It wasn’t what you’d think, the problem actually arose from working the clay too long and hard. It began to liquefy and the gray ran into the white making a mess. I ended up scrapping the entire second part of the body and started all over again from the wire skeleton. I got it right the second time and somehow the two body parts easily connected as I planned.

As a character, I sort of based him on the plight of the Native Americans where his land was abruptly taken away from him and his race. He also has a horn at his side that howls like a wolf. 

Name of figure: Gidium of the Verminog

Inspiration: Rodents, rats, pack rats, vermin, and plague.

Materials used: Polymer clay, tinfoil, glaze, craft wire

Length of time to complete: 2 days

Problems along the way: None that I remember

Mistakes: The eyes of the “hawk head helmet” would benefit from thin eyelids.

What I would change if I recreated this figure: The eyelids of the hawk head helmet.

What I like about this figure: Detail, sinister-looking face.

Notes: One of my earlier figures when inspiration was still running high. I had the idea for a character based on filthy, disease-carrying vermin. Gidium of the Verminog is the leader of his clan and wears a helmet made from a carved-out giant hawk head. The rest of his clothes are also the remains of the same bird. I put a backpack on him with a pack rat in mind. The tail not only helped him stand, but I had a specific idea of making one like that of an opossum – long and hairy. It’s hair matching the skin color of the tail much like that of my original inspiration.

Gidium came together surprisingly quickly. I still can’t believe how fast he came together that early on, my experience level still being minimal. At this point I learned that eyes (in most cases) are best sunken in a bit, building a base around them. Most commonly, this takes the form of eyelids and/or eyebrows. Luckily I learned this tweak early on giving figures a more realistic appearance.

 

Name of figure: Creeping Darkstone 

Inspiration: A swamp

Materials used: Polymer clay, tinfoil, glaze, craft wire, paint.

Length of time to complete: 3 days

Problems along the way: For the first and only time, the figures colors ran during baking (see notes for further explanation).

Mistakes: Not sure what went wrong in the oven.

What I would change if I recreated this figure: Nothing in particular.

What I like about this figure: Overall appearance.

Notes: I love the Creeping Darkstone. My wife hates it. That’s okay, everyone has their own opinion. Her argument is that it looks sloppy but that’s how it’s supposed to look. You see, the idea behind this character was to create a being whose body is completely made from rocks and stones that are held together by roots, vines, and branches. Its fingers and toes are also tree branches and vines. I purposely left the eyelids off on this one. I wanted the effect of the eye appearing rock-like. For such an idea, it’s best to expose the entire eyeball.

The Creeping Darkstone was one of my earliest creations. While building him was fairly simple, something happened while it was in the oven when the colors began to run and blend together. I have no explanation about why this happened, it’s the only such incident I ever experienced. So basically, once the Creeping Darkstone came out of the oven and cooled off, he needed a serious paint job. This is probably the true reason my wife hates this figure, she painted most of it. Technically, she’s the painter, I’m not aside from simple touch up work. 

Name of figure: Gorblagonn

Inspiration: ArmadilloAnkylosaurus

Materials used: Polymer clay, tinfoil, craft wire, paint.

Length of time to complete: 2 days

Problems along the way: None

Mistakes: None

What I would change if I recreated this figure: Make it smaller.

What I like about this figure: Overall appearance.

Notes:

The inspiration for the Gorblagonn came about one day when my wife and I were driving after picking our child up from pre-school. I was thinking about what my next subject would be when I saw a dead armadillo on the side of the road. Suddenly I told my wife that I could do something like that. The figure came together with ease. I layered the clay on the back to appear like an armadillo shell. For the tail, I had the idea of an ankylosaurus. My son was (and still is) heavily into dinosaurs. I liked them too at his age.

The face of the Gorblagonn took on a life of its own. You may find when making a polymer clay sculpture, that as your positioning the clay, new visions come about that weren’t part of the original plan. When that happens, just go with it. The face appeared as an elephant, especially as I was sculpting the ears. Feel free to go off track. It’s interesting to see where you end up. The result is usually positive.

 

I decided not to glaze the Gorblagonn. I felt it wasn’t necessary due to the texture of the skin and hair. A glaze job would have taken away from that to some extent. Besides that, the figure came out larger than expected and glazing isn’t the fun part of polymer clay sculpture. Sometimes it’s best to go without it. I go into this further with the Black Wizard Witalis Atrox.

Name of figure: The Black Wizard Witalis Atrox

Inspiration: Rhinoceros viper, evils wizards, demons

Materials used: Polymer clay, tinfoil, glaze, craft wire, paint

Length of time to complete: 3 days

Problems along the way: None, smooth ride

Mistakes: Probably should not have glazed him

What I would change if I recreated this figure: Wouldn’t use glaze and teak a few minor details.

What I like about this figure: Overall appearance

Notes: So, I needed a bad guy, a really bad guy for my story. An evil antagonist of epic proportions. While some of the figures features are sloppy, I think he definitely looks the vilest of anything I created. He could easily go head to head with Skeletor. I realize that’s a bold statement to make, especially in front of He-Man fans, but this guy looks utterly demonic.

The Black Wizard Witalis Atrox. The word “Atrox” is part of the scientific name of the western diamondback rattlesnake. The inspiration for the figure itself came from a rhinoceros viper I once kept as a pet in my young and crazy days. This snake was bad to the bone and I patterned the snake part of the body of Atrox to that of my rhinoceros viper. I miss that snake but venomous snake keeping is a dangerous and unforgiving hobby.

Ultimately, I achieved what I wanted to with this figure. This is one of those cases where glaze shouldn’t have been added. A shiny appearance doesn’t work well with such dark characters.

 

This was my third or fourth creation so trial and error was still going strong. Actually, I think sculpting polymer clay is always trial and era to some point. Experience definitely helps move you along but even the pros make mistakes (I don’t consider myself a pro by any means. I’m just a hobbyist having fun and this stuff is a lot of fun).

Name of figure: Chastenorg of the Norglung tribe

Inspiration: A monster on a heavy metal album cover

Materials used: Polymer clay, tinfoil, craft wire

Length of time to complete: 2 days

Problems along the way: None

Mistakes: Made the weapon too large. Some of his teeth were accidentally knocked out before photoing. I rushed on this one a bit.

What I would change if I recreated this figure: Minor tweaks to detail. His upper body (chest and shoulders) should be broader.

What I like about this figure: Brutal appearance

Notes: By the time I go to Chastenorg, my inspiration was beginning to diminish. The well was starting to run dry. This is one of the last figures I created during the years of 2015/16 before taking a long break. The last figure I created was Beastman from He-Man and The Masters of the Universe. You can see it HERE.

The idea for Chastenorg came from a UK heavy metal band. Their second album depicted a bunch of orc-like creatures charging a bridge over a moat. The music on the album itself wasn’t especially appealing but it was okay. Chastenorg is a big hulking brute. His weapon is bigger than needed but the figure easily stands up on his own. Unfortunately, he was dropped during the move to my new house and the fall knocked a few of his teeth out. Technically, there are a few hacks to fix this including good ol’Crazy Glue or simply sticking him back in the oven after replacing his teeth. As long as a polymer clay figure hasn’t been painted or glazed, it can be rebaked. I just wouldn’t recommend doing it several times. Only one or two times at the most.

His chest and shoulders would have benefited from more bulk. Adding more tinfoil to the skeleton would have been the best fix for that. His upper body looks someway deflated so it’s definitely something I’d fix if I decided to redo the figure.His chest and shoulders would have benefited from more bulk. Adding more tinfoil to the skeleton would have been the best fix for that. His upper body looks someway deflated so it’s definitely something I’d fix if I decided to redo the figure.

Name of figure: Agaric Folke

Inspiration: Traditional folklore, dwarves, foxes, nature

Materials used: Polymer clay, tinfoil, glaze, craft wire

Length of time to complete: 3 days

Problems along the way: None

Mistakes: None

What I would change if I recreated this figure: Nothing

What I like about this figure: It looks great as a garden gnome and looks as if it were professionally sculpted. 

Notes: I went into this with the idea of creating my own little niche in traditional folklore. Although this figure looks similar to a garden gnome, that wasn’t my original intention. Not at all. It certainly doesn’t look like something that can be made into an action figure, does it? I was thinking of a dwarf with a mushroom as part of its head and a fox tail out of its posterior. The glaze is especially effective on a figurine like this. You can make your own garden gnome-style figurines to keep outside if you use a weatherproof glaze. Honestly, as I was putting this one together, it just came out looking like something else. When it happens, I just go with it.

Name of figure: Gorblur the Haglid Troll

Inspiration: See winter ghoul 

Materials used: Polymer clay, tinfoil, glaze, craft wire

Length of time to complete: 1 day

Problems along the way: I got completely lost in the direction of the character.

Mistakes: A crack in the foot which apparently happened during baking. It’s the only time I’ve had such a crack so I’m not sure why it happened.

What I would change if I recreated this figure: Not really applicable 

What I like about this figure: It did come out interesting, just off track.

Notes: I posted this figure before the winter ghoul because it was originally intended as the winter ghoul. At least, that was my intention when I started sculpting Gorblur. The idea for the winter ghoul came from an old black metal song. I had this inspiration and idea in my head but didn’t know which direction to take it. So, with intending to create some kind of winter ghoul, I sat down and began sculpting. Something else quickly began to take shape which didn’t look like anything like a winter ghoul. No, this resembled more of a troll in appearance. As for the color of the skin, it looks like diarrhea medicine I took as a child. I don’t know what I was thinking.

That’s what happens when you go into something like this without a concrete plan, but I did get an extra figure out of it. The eventual figure that became the winter ghoul is better than this one, at least in my opinion. Still, I thought it would be more fitting to post Gorblur first as part of the winter ghouls evolution.

 

Name of figure: The winter ghoul 

Inspiration: A black metal song, black metal subculture, graveyards, winter, ghouls

Materials used: Polymer clay, tinfoil, craft wire, paint 

Length of time to complete: 1 day

Problems along the way: None that I can remember.

Mistakes: None

What I would change if I recreated this figure: Nothing 

What I like about this figure: Overall appearance. It’s definitely evil looking.

Notes:

My second attempt at the winter ghoul came out better. This time I went in with a plan. For the face, I would use black and white like corpse paint worn by black metal musicians. After all, the original inspiration came from a black metal song. Next, since ghouls hang around graveyards, I thought his flesh should appear as of it was rotting (sculpting the skin texture in such a way was a lot of fun). I finally got the skin color right on this one, creating a shade of blue with a winter feel to it. I chose not to use glaze and I think it was wise.

An interesting note – I blended the color of the clay to create an off-blue for the skin of the winter ghoul. When blending polymer clay to get a certain color, it warms up and isn’t as easy to work with because it becomes a little too pliable. In turn, I thought it would be best to paint the toenails black and not stick little black clay pieces to the toes because they wouldn’t stick well.

 

Name of figure: Fiendish Cornelius the Gidling

Inspiration: Rabbit, goblin, sprite, brownie, fairy, traditional folklore, satyr

Materials used: Polymer clay, tinfoil, craft wire, paint

Length of time to complete: 3 days

Problems along the way: Fiendish Cornelius began to melt on me while working on him.

Mistakes: Hands, feet, body, things got messy.

What I would change if I recreated this figure: Clean it up.

What I like about this figure: The general idea.

Notes: I’m melting, I’m melting… My idea for Fiendish Cornelius was completely clear in my mind…seriously. What happened? To get the skin color to where I wanted it, I had to mix many different colors of clay together. When you mix polymer clay and get it really warm, it gets difficult to work with. It becomes mushy and hard to mold or sculpt. What a battle I had trying to keep this guy together. He was falling apart everywhere, a nightmare. As if that weren’t enough, the brown for the lower part of his body also started to “melt” while I was working on it. His feet were equally disastrous. I think the basic idea for Fiendish Cornelius is great but I really should redo this one for a future blog post.

The idea for Fiendish Cornelius was a rabbit-like sprite with a witches hat and corkscrew tail. Believe it or not, there’s a little satyr in there too. His hat and shirt are Halloween inspired orange. He just needs a serious rework. At least he’s able to stand on his own two feet by himself. Sometimes when sculpting polymer clay, you have a bad day.

 

Name of figure: Caine Reapis

Inspiration: Traditional sword and sorcery “bad guy”. Duncan Regehr

Materials used: Polymer clay, tinfoil, craft wire

Length of time to complete: 3 days

Problems along the way: None to speak of

Mistakes: The body became leaner than I wanted

What I would change if I recreated this figure: More muscles

What I like about this figure: The general idea

Notes: One of the human characters I sculpted featured on this page. I actually sculpted several human “good guy” characters but I’m only happy with two of them, and ones a “bad guy”. Cain Reapis is the only human villain in the story. While Cain Reapis came out okay, he would have looked better with a more muscular frame. I hate to say it, but he reminds me of Han Solo’s son in the new Star Wars movies. Just for the record, Cain Reapis was sculpted back in early 2015, before the new Star Wars movie was released so Han Solo’s son was definitely not an inspiration. To be perfectly honest, I had Dirk Blackpool from Wizards & Warriors in mind while sculpting Cain Reapis. I don’t think you can tell looking at the figure. I have no plans of redoing Cain Reapis soon because the inspiration just isn’t there at present.

Name of figure: Hooded Mantik

Inspiration: Hooded executioner

Materials used: Polymer clay, tinfoil, craft wire

Length of time to complete: 1 day

Problems along the way: None, smooth sailing.

Mistakes: Chest area

What I would change if I recreated this figure: The chest area of the figure. The chest didn’t come out for what I was going for. 

What I like about this figure: The fact it’s similar to the build of a He-Man figure. This was unintentional.

Notes: Hooded Mantik is an executioner and assassin. His build is like that of generation one He-Man figures but this was unintentional. Although you can’t see it on the pictures, if you look through the two eye holes of the hood, you can see two eyes looking back at you.  He came together extremely fast only taking a single day to complete. 

Name of figure: Ivar Brun

Inspiration: Nordic Viking, Norway, warrior

Materials used: Polymer clay, tinfoil, craft wire, paint

Length of time to complete: 3 days

Problems along the way: None

Mistakes: His left arm is shorter than his right. Luckily, it’s hardly noticeable.

What I would change if I recreated this figure: Fixed left arm.

What I like about this figure: Build and overall appearance.

Notes: I think the inspiration for Ivar Brun is obvious. Of all the human warriors I sculpted (only three are posted on this page), Ivar came out the best and who I’m most proud of. Too bad one of his arms is shorter than the other, an oversight on my part. I don’t think it’s that noticeable anyway.

Ivar Brun is a traditional Viking warrior. At first, I thought he would be the leader of the “good guys”, but something about him appears as a second-in-command type or someone high on the ladder but ultimately not the absolute leader. I did create a leader for the “good guys” (Magnus Adamanteus) but I’m not happy with his simplicity and have no idea which way to take him. A few years ago I looked for someone to help out a bit but came up empty. For the time being, Ivar is my best human warrior until I finally decide to attempt another one. He was actually the first human I sculpted, everything went downhill from there so I’m not sure if he’ll ever be matched.

Name of figure: Weregoat

Inspiration: Werewolves and goats

Materials used: Polymer clay, tinfoil, craft wire, paint

Length of time to complete: 2 days

Problems along the way: None 

Mistakes: The face went a different direction than intended.

What I would change if I recreated this figure: Drop the pitchfork since it misrepresents the character.

What I like about this figure: Overall appearence

Notes: I know what you’re thinking. This is the devil with a pitchfork. Nothing could be further from the truth. I wanted to create a lycanthrope that hadn’t been thought of before. The only thing I could come up with was a cross between a wolf and a goat. I felt avoiding cloven hooves and going with five-toed feet would be more wolf-like. The biggest directional turn was when I attempted to sculpt the face which turned out more like a Texas Longhorn than a goat. Maybe it’s actually a werebull?

Anyway, a werebull wouldn’t fit the poem created for this character. Basically, the weregoats are farming folk by day, thus the pitchfork since farmers use them for hay. At night, they turn into weregoats. They’re actually not inherently evil by nature, they’re under a curse of the evil wizard Atrox. While the horns and pitchfork do not represent the devil, I can see why people would think so. It’s safe to say this character went a different direction than originally intended but it’s not bad, especially if I intended the face to resemble a bull.

 

Name of figure: Mountain Boomers

Inspiration: Collared lizards, Sleestak

Materials used: Polymer clay, tinfoil, craft wire, paint

Length of time to complete: 2 days

Problems along the way: Similar to the weregoat, the face went an entirely different direction than planned.

Mistakes: The toenails and fingernails, what was I thinking? 

What I would change if I recreated this figure: Tweaks and cleanup.

What I like about this figure: Although the face turned out looking more like a Tyrannosaurs Rex than a collared lizard, I like it. 

Notes: I’m a reptile enthusiast who once kept and bred collared lizards. Collared lizards are probably my favorite lizards of all and I wanted to create a character that closely resembled them, right down to the name. Early American explorers nicknamed collared lizards as mountain boomers when they erroneously believed these lizards created extremely loud sonic booms. Basic early America folklore. The Crotaphytus race is also named after the scientific name of the collared lizard.

In the end, I ended up with a collared lizard humanoid that actually looks more like a Tyrannosaurus rex dinosaur. It actually works to some degree, dinosaurs are much bigger part of popular American culture than collared lizards. Most people don’t know what a collared lizard is. The helmet was another unplanned part of the figure. It just came about actually. I can also say that another idea behind this character is loosely based on the Sleestak from the original Land of the Lost series.

When it comes to polymer clay sculpture, if you have a specific idea that you’re looking to achieve, drawing it out first on a sketchbook may help. On all these occasions which figure characteristics went different directions than planned, I always went with the image in my head. Sometimes it’s desirable to create something where the look of the clay dictates the direction of the figure. It just happens by itself. I guess you can compare it to looking up at the sky on a partly cloudy day. As you look at the clouds, shapes and pictures begin to form. It’s the same way with clay only you can further manipulate what you’re seeing.

 

Name of figure: The Giant Nullum

Inspiration: Cyclops, hill giants

Materials used: Polymer clay, tinfoil, craft wire

Length of time to complete: 2 days

Problems along the way: Even though this is one of my later figures, I had a difficult time getting him to stand on his own which is seldom the case. 

Mistakes: Some structural issues

What I would change if I recreated this figure: Not much

What I like about this figure: Skin color and facial detail

Notes: There’s definitely some Ray Harryhausen influence here. The basic idea behind the Giant Nullum was a cross between a cyclops and a hill giant. To make Giant Nullum unique, he was given a third eye.

Tri-Klops from He-Man and The Masters of the Universe was not an inspiration although I loved the character as a kid. The Giant Nullum is the type of giant that hurls huge boulders at you when he sees you. Still, he not necessarily a “bad guy” in the story. He’s more of a netural character. I decided to have him standing on a boulder for both visual effect and to help him stay upright only my idea didn’t work. The boulder actually inhibits him from standing on his own and I wouldn’t go that direction with any future figure. Other than that, he came together rather easily. I love his vibrant skin color but couldn’t match it if I tried.

Name of figure: The ScareRook

Inspiration: ScarecrowDark Night of the Scarecrow

Materials used: Polymer clay, tinfoil, craft wire

Length of time to complete: 1 day

Problems along the way: None

Mistakes: Face didn’t come out exactly as I envisioned it.

What I would change if I recreated this figure: Not sure

What I like about this figure: Basic appearance

Notes: The ScareRook is my vision of an evil scarecrow. Scarecrows have always been eerie, even more so than clowns in my opinion. This figure was one of the last ones I created and the tank was running very low at this point. I had created over thirty fantasy warriors over a six to eight-month period.

Here’s some sound advice for polymer clay sculpting. Don’t allow yourself to get burnt out and never rush to get a figure completed. Haste makes waste. You may also find yourself emotionally attracted to new creations thinking they’re better than they actually are. This is why it’s good to put a new figure on the shelf and forget about it for a while. Then, later on, when you see it again you’ll have a much more critical view on the outcome.

 

Name of figure: Smurglem the Asklevian

Inspiration: Troll, troglodyte, caveman

Materials used: Polymer clay, tinfoil, craft wire

Length of time to complete: 2 days

Problems along the way: None

Mistakes: None

What I would change if I recreated this figure: Nothing

What I like about this figure: Overall appearance

Notes: Another one of my later creature creations that hinted the creative tank was running low. Actually, I think Smurglem the Asklevian came out okay. I wanted a caveman-like humanoid that had feet with short legs but walked on its hands attached to noticeably long arms. In order to do this, I became confused while laying out the wire skeleton, like the feeling when you miss a turn on a road while driving. It worked out okay but definitely a challenging skeleton structure since it’s anatomically different from any such structure I created before.

Name of figure: The Jaqwalogs

Inspiration: The melonheads (American urban legend)

Materials used: Polymer clay, tinfoil, glaze, craft wire

Length of time to complete: 1 day

Problems along the way: None

Mistakes: Came out rather plain looking.

What I would change if I recreated this figure: Add more interesting detail.

What I like about this figure: The head

Notes: The inspiration for the Jaqwalogs comes directly from the American urban legend of the melonheads. There are a few different versions of the legend and how they actually came about depends on what state the story originated. I believe the states included were Michigan, Ohio, and Connecticut. I’m really surprised that no one featured this creepy legend in a horror movie yet. If I were a director/producer who had connections, I would begin work on a screenplay immediately. There’s something about driving along a road deep in the woods and spotting small humanoids with huge protruding heads. Other than the head, I believe the rest of the figure came out rather boring. Even though he has such a large head, he stands up perfectly on his own which is an achievement in itself when creating disproportionate figures.

I should also mention that while I’m a big fan of Tolkien, hobbits and halflings were not an inspiration for the Jaqwalogs. The character is based solely on the urban legend of the melonheads.

Name of figure: Wilabog

Inspiration: South American horned frogs aka Pacman Frog

Materials used: Polymer clay, tinfoil, paint, craft wire

Length of time to complete: 3 days

Problems along the way: Made him too heavy so he needs a wire stand in order to stand up straight.

Mistakes: Made the body too heavy.

What I would change if I recreated this figure: Make the body a bit smaller.

What I like about this figure: Overall appearance and detail.

Notes: The idea for the Wilabog is completely inspired by Pacman frogs which are commonly sold as pets. Of course, I gave hive some extra features and the ability to carry a large wooden club which he probably came across in his marshy home. This figure is so heavy and off-balance due to the size of the head, it needs a special stand in order for it to stand up on its own. It’s the only time I’ve had to resort to creating a separate stand for such a situation. Aside from that I’m completely satisfied with the figure and to correct an issue like this happening in the future, I suggest using more tin foil on the skeleton and less scaly. It’s the clay that makes him so heavy. 

Name of figure: Krakenmarus

Inspiration: Walrus, lobster, Kraken

Materials used: Polymer clay, tinfoil, craft wire

Length of time to complete: 1 day

Problems along the way: None

Mistakes: Made him too large

What I would change if I recreated this figure: Make him smaller

What I like about this figure: Facial detail, claws

Notes: The features of the Krakenmarus are family obvious, at least in my opinion. It’s pretty clear the creature features lobster claws and a walrus-type face and head.  The very name combines  Kraken with marine which came out to the Krakenmarus. I definitely made this figure too big because he takes up a lot of storage space. Still, I’m happy with the overall result.

Name of figure: Nithramous the Wizard

Inspiration: Wizard

Materials used: Polymer clay, tinfoil, craft wire

Length of time to complete: 1 day

Problems along the way: None

Mistakes: Slightly off centered 

What I would change if I recreated this figure: Not sure

What I like about this figure: Not sure 

Notes: While I needed a wizard for the “good guy” team, I wanted to avoid any kind of traditional mythology. Furthermore, I wanted to avoid making him appear anything like Gandalf.  While this wizard doesn’t look anything like Gandalf or traditional wizards in general, I’m not completely happy with the result. I went with a more alien feel to his head and facial features.  

Name of figure: Naggana

Inspiration: Naga

Materials used: Polymer clay, tinfoil, glaze, craft wire

Length of time to complete: 1 day

Problems along the way: None

Mistakes: Faces

What I would change if I recreated this figure: Add more facial detail.

What I like about this figure: It wasn’t hard to make.

Notes: I learned about nagas from Dungeons & Dragons way back in the early 1980’s. My way of creating a more unique looking one was to give her two heads. Such a figure wasn’t difficult to create at all although detail may have brought out a little more in her. Never rush during polymer clay sculpture. Always take your time and take a break if you get tired. The figure will still be there waiting for you when you’re ready.

Name of figure: Ganzorig the Mystic 

Inspiration: Mongolian wizard from an old Russsian sword and sorcery fantasy movie.

Materials used: Polymer clay, tinfoil, craft wire, paint

Length of time to complete: 2 days

Problems along the way: None

Mistakes: Wanted to make him appear older

What I would change if I recreated this figure: Make him appear older

What I like about this figure: Facial detail

Notes: Ther inspiration behind Ganzorig the mystic was a Mongolian mystic rather than an actual wizard. I think he came out okay although I wish I had made him older looking. After all, a mystic is wise and it’s more believable when such a character is older in appearance. Not my favorite figure but certainly not my worst as far as human characters go.

Name of figure: Goronlocke the Dragon

Inspiration: Tiamat, Dungeons & Dragons, Smaug, red dragon, hydra

Materials used: Polymer clay, tinfoil, craft wire

Length of time to complete: 4 days

 

Problems along the way: None

Mistakes: None

What I would change if I recreated this figure: Somewhat generic. Make it smaller.

What I like about this figure: Overall appearance, head detail.

Notes: So many things have been done with dragons over the years, it’s really hard to create a unique that you can call your own. I did my best with Goronlocke the Dragon giving him three heads to add at least some kind of originality. I’m sure there are three-headed dragons out there somewhere but none that I’ve come across or am aware of. At the present time Goronlocke the Dragon is under repair and will need to be baked again upon completion. It’s a good thing I didn’t paint or glaze him because if I had, I wouldn’t be able to bake him again.

Name of figure: Delilah the Witch

Inspiration: Evil witches from traditional folklore

Materials used: Polymer clay, tinfoil, craft wire

Length of time to complete: 1 day

Problems along the way: None

Mistakes: None

What I would change if I recreated this figure: This is a very generic looking witch. Perhaps make it more original somehow.

What I like about this figure: It’s okay for a generic looking witch.

Notes: I needed an evil witch for my story so I created Delilah, an ugly old had and that’s exactly what I was going for. Delilah the witch comes out rather generic looking. She wasn’t difficult to make at all and gave me no problems along the way.  I had no specific witches in mind while creating this character. I’ll be creating a new witch in the coming months for the blog. 

Name of figure: Brontosaurus

Inspiration: Brontosaurus dinosaur

Materials used: Polymer clay, tinfoil, glaze, craft wire, paint

Length of time to complete: 1 day

Problems along the way: None

Mistakes: Needs larger midsection

What I would change if I recreated this figure: Make the body a bit more chunky.

What I like about this figure: Overall appearance

Notes: This figurine has nothing to do with the  Quest for Kimel Drago story. My son was (and still is) a fanatic of dinosaurs. My first attempt was a small tyrannosaurs rex but I was still new to polymer clay sculpture and it didn’t come out very well (this was a few months before I created the mountain boomer which actually looked more like a tyrannosaurus rex). A few months later I threw together a Brontosaurus for him. He still happily keeps it in his room next to his television.

I think this figure came out okay for as much effort as I put into it. The Brontosaurus is usually depicted as being heavier in the body. While this is slimmer, I don’t think it takes much away from the overall result. It was fun to make. I guess I can throw in that I was a really big fan of the original Land of the Lost series, but Dopey wasn’t really an inspiration. 

 

Name of figure: Unnamed (The Ring Bearer – unofficial nickname)

Inspiration: Pirate

Materials used: Polymer clay, tinfoil, craft wire

Length of time to complete: 1 day

Problems along the way: None

Mistakes: None

What I would change if I recreated this figure: Nil

What I like about this figure: Hook hand

Notes: Towards the end of a highly prolific 2015/16, I found I needed a place to store my wedding ring without losing it. I created this figure, roughly based on a ghoulish, undead pirate with a hook for a hand. The purpose of the hook is to hold my wedding ring. It works great for the purpose. I didn’t go in with a solid idea like the figures but it ended up looking like a ghoulish zombified hybrid between Azog and Thorin Oakensheild. This was completely unintentional.  Anyway, he makes a good ring bearer.

Name of figure: Unnamed (the subject of my first polymer clay tutorial)

Inspiration: Loosely based on an Orc

Materials used: Polymer clay, tinfoil, craft wire

Length of time to complete: 2 day

Problems along the way: None

Mistakes: None

What I would change if I recreated this figure: Nil

What I like about this figure: Facial details

Notes: This guy is the subject of my first tutorial for this website. I put a limited amount of time in its creation for the purpose of the tutorial which didn’t come out bad. Sure, I could have done a better job if I had taken more time on him but I think he’s fine for the purpose of his creation.

The Quest for Kimel Drago

Polymer Clay Fantasy Figurines

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